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Anole Care Guide: Your Ultimate Guide to Anole Care and Maintenance

If you’re looking for a pet that’s low maintenance, easy to care for, and visually stunning, look no further than the anole lizard. Anoles, also known as American chameleons, are small, arboreal lizards that are native to the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. These lizards are popular as pets because of their small size, low maintenance requirements, and their ability to change colors. In this ultimate guide to anole care and maintenance, we’ll cover everything you need to know to keep your anole healthy and happy.

Choosing an Anole

The first step in caring for an anole is to choose the right one. Here are a few things to consider when selecting an anole:

Species

anole Lizard

There are several species of anoles, each with their own unique characteristics and care requirements. The most commonly kept species include the green anole (Anolis carolinensis) and the brown anole (Anolis sagrei). Other species that are kept as pets include the knight anole (Anolis equestris), the Jamaican giant anole (Anolis garmani), and the Cuban green anole (Anolis porcatus).

Age

When selecting an anole, it’s best to choose a young one. Anoles that are too old may have difficulty adjusting to their new environment and may be more prone to health problems.

Health

Choose an anole that appears healthy and active. Look for an anole that has clear eyes, a healthy appetite, and smooth skin. Avoid anoles that have sunken eyes, lethargy, or other signs of illness.

Setting up an Anole Habitat

Once you’ve selected your anole, it’s time to set up its habitat. Here are the steps you need to follow to create a suitable home for your anole:

Cage

Anoles are arboreal lizards, which means they need a tall cage that provides plenty of vertical space to climb and perch. A cage that is at least 18 inches tall is recommended. The cage should also be large enough to allow your anole to move around freely. A 10-gallon tank is the minimum size recommended for one or two anoles.

Lighting and Heating

Anoles require UVB lighting to stay healthy. UVB lighting is necessary for the synthesis of vitamin D3, which is essential for calcium absorption. A fluorescent UVB bulb should be placed in the cage and left on for 10-12 hours a day. In addition to UVB lighting, anoles require a basking area with a heat lamp that provides a temperature gradient in the cage. The basking area should be kept at around 85-90°F, while the rest of the cage should be kept at around 75-80°F during the day and around 70°F at night.

Substrate

The substrate is the material that lines the bottom of the cage. Anoles need a substrate that is both absorbent and easy to clean. Options include coconut coir, sphagnum moss, and reptile carpet.

Decorations

Anoles need plenty of hiding spots and climbing surfaces in their habitat. Provide your anole with a variety of branches, vines, and other climbing structures. You can also add plants to the cage, such as pothos, to provide additional climbing surfaces and to help maintain humidity levels in the cage.

Water and Humidity

Anoles need access to fresh water at all times. A shallow water dish should be provided, and the water should be changed daily. Anoles also require moderate humidity levels in their habitat. Mist the cage once or twice a day to maintain humidity levels. You can also place a humidity gauge in the cage to monitor the humidity levels. The ideal humidity range for anoles is around 60-80%.

Anole Diet and Feeding

Anoles are insectivores, which means they primarily eat insects. Here are some guidelines for feeding your anole:

Types of Insects

Anoles will eat a variety of insects, including crickets, mealworms, waxworms, and roaches. It’s important to provide a variety of insects to ensure your anole gets all the nutrients it needs.

Feeding Schedule

Anoles should be fed once a day, and the amount of food should be based on the size of the anole. A good rule of thumb is to feed your anole as many insects as it can eat in 5-10 minutes. Any uneaten insects should be removed from the cage to prevent them from bothering or harming your anole.

Gut Loading and Supplementation

It’s important to gut-load insects before feeding them to your anole. This means feeding the insects a nutritious diet before offering them to your anole. You can also dust the insects with a calcium supplement before feeding them to your anole. This will ensure that your anole is getting all the nutrients it needs to stay healthy.

Anole Health and Maintenance

Anoles are relatively low maintenance pets, but they do require some care to stay healthy. Here are some tips for maintaining your anole’s health:

Handling

Anoles can be handled, but they are delicate creatures and should be handled with care. Always support your anole’s body when picking it up, and avoid squeezing or gripping it too tightly. It’s also important to wash your hands before and after handling your anole to prevent the spread of bacteria.

Shedding

Anoles shed their skin periodically, and it’s important to monitor their shedding to ensure that it’s happening properly. Signs of abnormal shedding include difficulty shedding or incomplete shedding. If you notice any issues with shedding, consult a veterinarian.

Health Problems

Anoles can develop health problems, such as respiratory infections, parasites, and metabolic bone disease. Signs of illness include lethargy, loss of appetite, difficulty breathing, and abnormal behavior. If you notice any signs of illness, consult a veterinarian as soon as possible.

Cleaning

Anoles require a clean habitat to stay healthy. Clean the cage once a week, and spot clean as necessary. Use a reptile-safe cleaner to clean the cage and any decorations.

Conclusion

Brown anole

Anoles are fascinating and low-maintenance pets that are ideal for people who want a small pet that doesn’t require a lot of attention. By following the guidelines in this anole care guide, you can provide your anole with a comfortable and healthy home. Remember to choose the right anole, set up a suitable habitat, provide a nutritious diet, and maintain your anole’s health to ensure that it lives a long and happy life.

FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions about anole care:

How long do anoles live?

Anoles can live up to 5-8 years in captivity with proper care.

Do anoles need special lighting?

Yes, anoles require UVB lighting to stay healthy. A fluorescent UVB bulb should be placed in the cage and left on for 10-12 hours a day.

Can anoles be housed together?

Anoles can be housed together, but it’s important to provide enough space and hiding spots to prevent aggression. It’s also recommended to only house the same species of anoles together.

Do anoles require a special diet?

Anoles are insectivores and require a diet of live insects. It’s important to provide a variety of insects to ensure your anole gets all the nutrients it needs.

How often should I clean my anole’s habitat?

Clean the cage once a week, and spot clean as necessary. Use a reptile-safe cleaner to clean the cage and any decorations.

Can anoles be handled?

Anoles can be handled, but they are delicate creatures and should be handled with care. Always support your anole’s body when picking it up, and avoid squeezing or gripping it too tightly.

What are the signs of an unhealthy anole?

Signs of illness include lethargy, loss of appetite, difficulty breathing, and abnormal behavior. If you notice any signs of illness, consult a veterinarian as soon as possible.